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jackie

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #1 

  Hannah,

 

  what is  the MOST   effective , proven   active for melasma ?

hannah

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Reply with quote  #2 
I am writing something on melasma. In the meantime, here is a list of actives that could help:
Sunscreen (sun avoidance even better)

Ascorbic acid (unstable, mix weekly)
Peels
Retinoic acid (Retin-A)
Kojic acid. Unstable, mix weekly.
Melatonin (soon at SAS!)
Liquorice
MAP (magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, a more stable form of ascorbic acid)
Glutathione
Ellagic acid
Lemon peel extract (to be listed today)

...and arbutin (thanks, Disciple!)



Donna

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Hannah,
Above it says you are listing lemon peel extract-Is it's main function to serve as a skin lightener?
hannah

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Yes. And sun (age, liver) spots, hyperpigmentation in general.
blkbird

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Reply with quote  #5 
I am also interested in treating hyperpigmentation. What combinations of the ingredients in your actives list would be complimentary to each other and not render any ineffective? How many ingredients can be mixed together?
Thank you.


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blkbird
wor102

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #6 
Hannah, since you've been doing ELS for dry skin people, would you be interested to come up with a potion for lightening hyperpigment for those with uneven tone skin (may it be from sun or age or acne scars)? This way, you can also mix those ingredients that are hard to deal with (like betulinic) for us. hee hee...
faithfully10

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peggissue
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I've read that pearl powder is good for treating/preventing melasma/hyperpigmention. I see that skin actives does not sell it.  What are your thoughts on pearl powder for melasma treatment?

hannah

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Reply with quote  #8 
Pearl powder is mostly calcium carbonate. I can't see what it should help with hyperpigmentation, although the light reflecting properties of pearl powder have long been used to hide wrinkles (now there are synthetic pigments that do this job).

If anybody has different information, please let us know.
Sas

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Reply with quote  #9 

 

Hannah,

 

I noticed that you did not put Niacinimide on your list of actives for Melasma.

As this is a skin lightener too, would it not be good for Melasma aswell?

 

I am a  newbie and I 'm trying to real most of the posts before I put in my first order. Just want to make sure I am ordering exactly what I need.

I am loving this site!

 

Thank you for all your helpful informtion.

hannah

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Thanks for writing and for making such a good point. Niacinamide is not a skin lightener in the sense of inhibiting the synthesis of melanin, although it seems to decrease melanosome transfer to keratinocytes (see abstract below).

Niacinamide is probably good for everything, and everybody should be using it, not just as a skin lightener.

 Hakozaki, T.; Minwalla, L.; Zhuang, J.; Chhoa, M.; Matsubara, A.; Miyamoto, K.; Greatens, A.; Hillebrand, G. G.; Bissett, D. L.; Boissy, R. E. (2002)  The effect of niacinamide on reducing cutaneous pigmentation and suppression of melanosome transfer.   7F,  Procter & Gamble Far East, Inc.,  Koyo-cho, Higashinada-ku, Kobe,  Japan.    British Journal of Dermatology 147(1),  20-31.

Cutaneous hyperpigmentation occurs in multiple conditions.  In addn., many Asian women desire a lighter skin color.  Thus, there is a need for the development of skin lightening agents.  Niacinamide is a possible candidate.  The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of niacinamide on melanogenesis in vitro and on facial hyperpigmentation and skin color in vivo in Japanese women.  Melanin prodn. was measured in a purified mushroom tyrosinase assay, cultured melanocytes, a keratinocyte/melanocyte co-culture model, and a pigmented reconstructed epidermis (PREP) model.  The clin. trials included 18 subjects with hyperpigmentation who used 5% niacinamide moisturizer and vehicle moisturizer in a paired design, and 120 subjects with facial tanning who were assigned to two of three treatments: vehicle, sunscreen and 2% niacinamide + sunscreen.  Changes in facial hyperpigmentation and skin color were objectively quantified by computer anal. and visual grading of high-resoln. digital images of the face.  Niacinamide had no effect on the catalytic activity of mushroom tyrosinase or on melanogenesis in cultured melanocytes.  However, niacinamide gave 35-68% inhibition of melanosome transfer in the co-culture model and reduced cutaneous pigmentation in the PREP model.  In the clin. studies, niacinamide significantly decreased hyperpigmentation and increased skin lightness compared with vehicle alone after 4 wk of use.  The data suggest niacinamide is an effective skin lightening compd. that works by inhibiting melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes. 

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