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Am looking at the Life Extension Creams --

 

http://www.lifeextensionvitamins.com/renewul.html

 

http://www.lifeextensionvitamins.com/reululredcrn.html

 

Will you be carrying topical DHEA, RNA, beta glucan, or melatonin in the future?

 

Thanks! 

 

hannah

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Reply with quote  #2 
You will find RNA in our bioferments, both sea kelp and pumpkin, as RNA is present in all living cells. It is a good idea to have RNA fragments as part of good nutrition for aging skin, just as it is nice to have other nutrients (sugars, amino acids, lipids, etc.) but don't expect magic!

I have my strong reservations on DHEA (do you watch Dr. G on the Discovery channel? if not, ask me to tell you the DHEA horror story) although it would probably be fine for topical use. I will look again at the research on it topical use to see whether there is something new that makes it worth while for us to make it available to our clients..

Beta glucan is a very general term that means that the sugar monomers are attached to each other via beta glucosidic bonds (fructans, cellulose). We have some beta glucan used in skin care but I have been hesitant re. adding it to our list. Let me look again at the research and maybe we will list it.

About melatonin, again I will have to look at the research. I am not aware of melatonin being used topically.

Sorry I cannot give you firm answers but will look into all of these and give you a firmer reply in a couple of days.

stillyoung

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #3 
Hannah, my husband takes DHEA regularly. What is the horror story?


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Reply with quote  #4 

I have low adrenal function and low blood serum DHEA, take a daily supplement (as per my doctor's instructions). I am aware of the overuse of DHEA, it's a powerful hormone! The Life Extension Foundation offers a cream with DHEA & melatonin that has just enough of the 2 substances to help your skin, but not get into circulation.

 

Here's the LEF's take on skin aging -- I'd love to hear your take on their theories!

 

http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-099.shtml

 

*************************************

An excerpt:

 

DHEA and Melatonin
The sleep hormone (melatonin) and the anti-stress hormone (DHEA) are both found in human skin. Both are converted to other entities with important jobs to do. DHEA is converted into estrogen- and androgen-type metabolites found only in skin (Labrie et al. 2000). Melatonin is synthesized in skin. In low concentrations it can stimulate cell growth. This type of on-site, organ-specific production of hormones is called intracrine biosynthesis . Intracrine biosynthesis allows different organs to manufacture the substances they need without flooding the entire body with growth factors.

Estrogen's skin-enhancing effects are well-known (Dunn et al. 1997; Shah et al. 2001). It provokes collagen and a moisture factor known as hyaluronic acid . Aging decreases both estrogen and collagen. Enzymes that convert DHEA to estrogen also decline. Not surprisingly, women who take synthetic estrogen have scientifically proven thicker skin. Women who take both estrogen and testosterone have really thick skin (48% thicker than women who don't take either hormone) (Brincat et al. 1983). DHEA is converted to both estrogen and testosterone, providing the benefits of both hormones.

Although the exact roles of DHEA and melatonin in human skin are still under scrutiny, researchers have identified several mechanisms through which these hormones protect against aging, maintain the health of skin, and affect how sunlight reacts with skin cells.

Skin is such a specialized organ that it has its own immune system. It has been proposed that faulty skin immunity affects the entire immune system. Sunlight can penetrate deep into skin and alter immunity directly, or it can cause changes in dermis and epidermis that provoke immune changes. Sunlight affects hormones. It decreases melatonin, norepinephrine, and acetylcholine, and increases cortisol, serotonin, GABA, and dopamine.

Studies show that both DHEA and melatonin are absorbed by skin when applied topically. A study from CHUL Research Center (in Canada) shows that the activity of DHEA applied topically is 85-90% greater than when taken orally (at least in rodents). No special carriers are needed to get DHEA and melatonin into skin. A properly formulated topical preparation of melatonin and DHEA will contain just enough hormone to benefit skin without providing enough to escape into circulation. It makes sense to apply the hormones directly to the skin if skin protection is the goal, since ingested hormones may end up everywhere but the skin (Labrie et al. 2000).


DHEA Saves Skin

DHEA has beneficial effects beyond its conversion to skin-friendly hormones. DHEA itself has powerful skin protective effects. A study in the Journal of Surgical Research demonstrates the extraordinary ability of topically applied DHEA to protect skin's delicate blood vessels. Researchers found that if DHEA was applied after a serious burn, the blood vessels underlying the burned area are protected (Araneo et al. 1995). Protecting the blood vessels saves the skin. Skin and blood vessels that would otherwise die and peel off can be saved by DHEA. No one knows for sure how DHEA saves skin this way, but its anti-inflammatory action no doubt has something to do with it. DHEA prevents destructive white blood cells and their biochemical cousins from gearing up. In particular, DHEA affects a blood vessel killer known as "tumor necrosis factor."

DHEA has action against everyday insults as well. By maintaining skin immunity, DHEA preserves the ability of skin to react to cancer-causing, skin-destroying pollutants in air, food, and water. DHEA also has antioxidant action against peroxyl and superoxide free radicals.

Free radical defense may have a lot to do with DHEA's ability to prevent skin cancer and papillomas (benign tumors). According to several studies in mice, topically applied DHEA keeps oxidant-loving enzymes at bay. Chemicals with carcinogenic potential depend on oxidases for transformation. DHEA's antioxidant action stops them (Schwartz et al. 1986a; Schwartz et al. 1986b; Hastings et al. 1988). DHEA has another important defense: It keeps chemical carcinogens from binding to DNA (Pashko et al. 1985; Pashko et al. 1991).


Melatonin Protects

Melatonin is an antioxidant hormone that protects against UV radiation (Fischer et al. 1999). A group at the University of Zurich has shown that topical melatonin gives excellent protection against sunburn if applied before sun exposure (Bangha et al. 1997). Melatonin also appears to have a role in repairing burned skin. In a study in Brain Research Bulletin , melatonin levels rose 6 hours after burn injury, then fell to normal (Scott et al. 1986).

In small amounts, melatonin causes skin cells to proliferate. (In large amounts, it stops proliferation.) People with psoriasis and atopic eczema do not have normal melatonin secretion. Instead of peaks, they have valleys. With psoriasis, melatonin peaks in the day when it shouldn't, and patients have little at night. It is surprising that a hormone connected to sleep has a lot to do with skin health, but maybe not to those researchers who consider the pineal gland another endocrine gland. Melatonin is secreted by the pineal gland.

 

*****************************************

 

I look forward to hearing your take on this! Thaks so much -- can't wait to get my shipment -- (*Hoo-Hoo-Hoo-Ha-Ha-Ha* -- the mad scientist emerges,...    )

 

P.S. I'm the one in cow country, Ohio --

hannah

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Reply with quote  #5 
I love discussion!!!!

The horror story from Dr G. (a program on a real medical examiner, amazingly pleasant to watch despite the subject because Dr. G. is fantastic!). A lady dies, autopsy required because they have no idea why she died. The husband says he does not understand why she died as "she was such a healthy person". She did not look healthy at all, but she was health conscious in the sense that she took lots of  food supplements. Short story: she wreaked her body with DHEA. Moral: you don't play with hormones but, of course, you take those that your doctor gives you (I do)!!!!
More about DHEA after I have time to read all the references you all sent me!!!!



hannah

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Reply with quote  #6 
Dear Danny,

Hyaluronic acid is horribly expensive but eventually we will stock it. In the meantime, please believe me that your skin has the capacity to convert the polysaccharides present in sea kelp bioferment and convert them into hyaluronic acid. Scientists at the institute where I got my PhD did the pioneering work (Nobel prize for it in 1970)  on carbohydrate synthesis (I am name dropping again, that's terrible!).

I will look into the other ingredient you mention and see how "miraculous" it really is. As you know, it is very hard to distinguish what is marketing language and what is real. Will write again with the news.
stillyoung

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #7 
What do you mix with hyaluronic acid powder to make it into a serum? Just curious. I too am interested in purchasing when you stock it.

Thanks,
Shirley
hannah

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Reply with quote  #8 
What is a serum? I have seen this term used as opposed to cream or lotion, which are emulsions oil/water. The  lists og ingredients I have seen include water and a polysaccharide and/or other thickeners, but not oil.
For example (this is a serum by Perricone): Aqua (water), Magnesium Aspartate (and) Zinc Gluconate (and) Copper Gluconate, Dimethyl MEA (DMAE), PEG-400, CL-F5 Neuropeptide, Phenoxyethanol (and) Methylparaben (and) Ethylparaben (and) Butylparaben (and) Propylparaben (and) Isopropylparaben, Fragrance.

Water + salts + Polyethylene glycol                                 (PEG)-400  (one of the most widely used co-solvents for improving the                                 aqueous solubility of hydrophobic chemicals).

From Estee Lauder: Water, Cyclomethicone, Dimethicone, Polysilicone-11, silica, Butylene Glycol, Yeast Extract, Dimethicone Copolyol, Morus Nigra (Mulberry) Root Extract, Scutellaria Baicalensis Extract, Siegesbeckia Orientalis extract, Narcissus Tazetta Bulb Extract Salvia Sclarea Extract, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract, Centella Asiatica Extract, Hordeum Vulgare (Barley) Extract, Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Fruit Extract, Sacchromyces Lysate Extract, Disodium Distyrylbiphenyl Disulfonate, Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract, Aminopropyl Ascorbyl Phosphate, Polysorbate 40 - Silybum Marianum (Lady's Thistle) Extract, Sodium Beta-Sitosteryl Sulfate, Palmitoyl Pentapeptide-3, Tocopheryl Acetate, Glycerin, Ammonium Acryloyldimethyltaurate/VP Copolymer, Cholesterol, Linoleic Acid, Squalane, Pantethine, Sodium Hyaluronate, HDI/Trimethylol Hexyl-lactone Crosspolymer, Sodium Chloride, Sodium Carbomer, Polysorbate 20, Fragrance, Disodium EDTA, Postassium Sorbate, Phenoxyethanol, Methylparaben, Mica, Titanium Dixoide.

This serum: lots of polymers (mostly silicones), glycerine, and plant extracts that are mostly water + propylene glycol. Almost no lipids.

Again, my preference would be to go for sea kelp bioferment, because you have a ready-made serum. But that's just my opinion (and I am not a cosmetic chemist!).

hannah

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Reply with quote  #9 
I promised to find more about hydroxytyrosol.

This is a polyphenol from olive (closely related to oleuropein). Dr Perricone has an agreement with the producer of olive extract in the US so I do not know whether it will be possible to get it.

Although I would love to have hydroxytyrosol in stock to get more hits in Ebay ...there is a very nice (and inexpensive) way of getting hydroxytyrosol in your body and your skin: use virgin olive oil in your salads. Getting hydroxytyrosol on your skin will be even easier: add some olive oil to your bath.

The manufacturers' claim is not that hydroxytirosol is special and does something that no other chemical can do, but that it is one of the strongest antioxidants available. I have to look at the numbers but I doubt that hydroxytyrosol  will be more potent that astaxanthin. 

vanyel5

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #10 
hi hannah,
   i just wanted to reply to your question about what is a serum since i am one who requested a serum base...but i guess what i was looking for was something slightly more fluid than a moisturizing cream, but still thicker than water, and with a silky silicone base...you are correct, the bioferment would probably be a great base for serum but i was wondering if you had any ideas as to how i could get it more silky like what i am looking for?  i know where i can get some dimethicone, dimethicone/cyclomethicone, and cyclomethicone and was curious if i added some of one or more of those to the sea kelp if it would get me what i wanted?
    just for reference i am wanting something very similar to the base used for the olay regenerist serum...i swear it feels like liquid silk going on, and i am sure the silicone base gives it a little more play on the skin before absorbing.
    thanks in advance for any words of wisdom!
              joseph
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