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hannah

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Rosacea

Rosacea is a chronic skin disorder that affects more than ten million Americans, with almost half of the sufferers aged between 30 and 50 years old. The disease has been called “the Celtic curse” because it affects more often people of Northern European descent.  Women are more likely to suffer rosacea of the milder form, and men more frequently have the severe form, which involves deformity of the nose. Rosacea nearly always appears on sun damaged skin.

Except for cases precipitated by use of steroids, the causes of rosacea are not known, but there are several discredited theories, including those involving skin mites (Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis), and the bacterium Helicobacter pylori.  Because we do not know what causes the disease, there are no good treatment and all that can be done is to prevent irritation and inflammation.

Rosacea develops in stages and is characterized by "twitchy" blood vessels, i.e., subcutaneous blood vessels that are too sensitive. Almost anything will start flushing and blushing episodes followed by redness of the skin caused by congestion of the capillaries and chronic dilation of capillaries causing elevated dark red blotches on the skin. Rosacea patients may develop severe sebaceous gland growth that is accompanied by papules, pustules, cysts, and nodules. Inflammatory lesions develop in the areas of erythema and may look like acne, but in rosacea there are no comedones, the primary event in acne.

It can be difficult to distinguish acne, eczema, and other skin affections from rosacea, but it is very important to recognize rosacea because, although it cannot be cured right now, early recognition and treatment can prevent progression to disfigurement.

There are several medical treatments used to attenuate the effects of rosacea rather than cure it, and laser treatment can help with telangiectasia or deformation of the nose.

Azelaic acid (or azeloyl glycine) is effective in the treatment of rosacea, particularly at the stage when there are papules and pustules. [Glycolic acid is beneficial for all stages of rosacea, both in the higher concentrations of glycolic peels used by professionals, and at the lower concentrations for home use (3-10%).] Before trying peels, please see posting below with Artist's opinion on glycolic acid!

It is important to avoid precipitating factors such as sun exposure, stress, cold weather, hot beverages, cigarette smoke, alcohol consumption, and any foods that you noticed exacerbate your rosacea. Any cosmetics used must be non-comedogenic and nonirritating; use sunblock and avoid sun exposure, because sun damage is one of the factors that precipitate rosacea.

Skin Actives sells soothing extracts (licorice) and anti-inflammatory ingredients known to help with rosacea. Centella asiatica, and horse chestnut extracts are well known for their capillary strengthening properties. Our clients have reported excellent results with sea kelp bioferment used on its own (please see our forum).

Finally, EGF seems to have quasi-magical properties,  and it has practically cleared roscaea symptoms for some of our clients.
aaclouti

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #2 
Hannah thank you for posting this! I am currently trying the Sea Kelp Bioferment and LOVE it so far. I'll definitely run out of this quickly!

This may be confusing because rosaceanet, for one, does recommend glycolic acid peels:

http://www.skincarephysicians.com/rosaceanet/treatment.html

I don't think this is widely known, except among rosacea suffers themselves, but for many, AHA peels actually brought on their rosacea. For others, they made redness and irritation worse. This is from my approximately 8 years of experience as a regular member of the yahoo rosacea support group. We generally run fast from anything that takes a layer of skin off or aggressively exfoliates. Some have good luck with periodic use of BHA (Beta Hydroxy Acids) to gently exfoliate, but even then I would be very careful.

So perhaps once or twice AHA use is ok? I'm not sure. My instinct is to definitely skip the glycolic acid. I'd go right for the Sea Kelp Bioferment and other anti-inflammatory, soothing, and capillary strengthening actives, as Hannah stated.

THANKS again!





herwheels

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #3 

So... it follows, then, that anything which takes of a layer of skin, like shaving, could exacerbate rosacea...?  my brother suffers from this, and his is pretty much confined to the lower part of his face, where he shaves.  I put together a salve for him, using all the stuff mentioned in Hannah's post (thanks for that, BTW).  after reading aaclouti's follow-up, I got to thinking that there must be a milder way to scare whiskers off a guy's face.  Any non-irritating ideas?

aaclouti

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peggissue
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From what I know about guys with rosacea and shaving, a good electic razor should not be irritating. I think the most difficult part may be finding a shaving cream that doesn't irritate. They are all so fragrant and full of "stimulating", "invigorating" ingredients and preservatives that can aggravate rosacea! If he insists on using a straight razor, perhaps he can try the sea kelp bioferment as a shaving cream? So far this stuff makes my rosacea skin feel wonderful. It comes with a little tube of Decyl glucoside. If you mix that with it you have an extremely, delightfully gentle facewash that I'm sure could be used to shave with due to the gel-like quality.

I have been using the sea kelp bioferment to wash with, and the zinc oxide cream recipe I posted, and my skin loves them both.

How kind of you to make a salve for him! Due to the fact that rosacea skin can react very easily, I'd advise him to use it in one small test spot for a few days just to be sure.

I have recently improved a great deal due to a series of IPL treatments with a Lumenis One machine, so I recommend that if he is considering laser/IPL. Photoderm (another IPL machine) is great, too.
aaclouti

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #5 
Vicky wrote:

"After mixing specifically-targeted creams & potions for a few of my friends, I've started getting requests! So far, I've done one for rosacea, one for psoriasis, and one for melasma. It's amazing how excited people get. I used to be content with showing up with a batch of cookies and announcing "look what I made for you!" but this is a whole new kind of gratification. I'll post results & recipes in a few weeks when my guinea pigs report back to me."

Vicky: Any feedback? Or, did you post it and I missed it? I am most interested regarding the rosacea cream you made. What was in it? Did it help? Rosacea can be very tricky.

I agree regarding how excited folks get. I made a friend, who is also a busy new mom, a vit c serum and she was SO excited! Being homemade makes our creations unique and special. The fact that they WORK makes them fantabulous! Everyone loves to treat themselves once in a while, and they deserve it

Thanks!
herwheels

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #6 

sorry I haven't posted the results yet--I keep forgetting to bring my recipes back to work & my home computer is having a freakout

 

the cream I made for psoriasis was the most successful, I think because my special gentleman friend is obsessive about using it.  the rosacea cream is least successful, but again, it's TOTALLY because my brother is a slacker and hasn't been diligent. 

 

i'll post complete recipes & results ASAP.  thanks for the reminder!

aaclouti

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peggissue
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Vicky: Since I have had rosacea for 8 years, perhaps I can help narrow down the ingredients that might be helpful or harmful. Rosacea is very individual, and creams with a lot of ingredients, preservatives, fragrances, etc tend to really irritate.

I would start with just a sea kelp base mixed about 50/50 with an oil. Jojoba oil is popular for rosacea. I use Emu oil. Neither are comedogenic. The oil is important, as rosacea skin must be moisturized. Then start with a small concentration of any of the following:

Chamomile
Green Tea
Caffeine
Calendula (only if he does not have an allergy tendancy)
Niacinamide
Liquorice
Hyaluronic Acid
Grape Seed Extract
Centella asiatica

There are several other actives I want to try, but these are the ones currently seen in rosacea skincare lines.
herwheels

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #8 

oh, brother likes the rosacea lotion and was very excited when i made it. i'm just saying he can be slacker-ish...  and this time of year, he likes his beer & popeye's fried chicken, playing pool (smokey bars, yuck!), watching football with his buddies & all that ...  so i'm thinking that the cream would have a much more dramatic effect if he actually remembered to use it , and cut out a few environmental factors...  but soon it will be tennis & softball season...  all this will change... 

aaclouti

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #9 
ha ha!! I am excited to know the recipe. He is lucky to have a nice sister to make him wonderful remedies for his rosacea


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Reply with quote  #10 

I can NEVER use glycolic acid on my skin -- as aaclouti said, I suspect it helped speed along my development of rosacea. Even niacinamide in more than just the tiniest doses, causes a flare-up.

 

A great treatment for rosacea is the aspirin mask -- aspirin is salicylic acid, which is anti-inflammatory. If my skin is especially red, I crush up 6 uncoated aspirin in warm water, and apply it to my face, leave on for a few minutes, then rinse. Ahhhhh..... feels so soothing, and the redness is gone.


Note from Hannah. Aspirin is acetylsalycilic acid.  Skin Actives Scientific sells the natural version, white willow bark extract, which contains salicin, a less irritating form of the chemical.

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