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Seanyseanuk

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #1 
Hannah

Whats your views on eye creams - are they really all they are cracked up to be to prevent the eye area from aging?  I know that I saw a program on tv once which had a plastic surgeon doing a lower lid lift, and at one point he showed the camera a part of the operation where he was removing fluid and he said to the camera that whenever he did lower lift operations, there was always some fluid to be removed which usually were either a mixture of fluids from eyecream products or a build up of toxins.  Now I know that the person wasn't using SAS products, but it did get me thinking do we actually need eyecreams in the first place? 

Whats your thoughts on this?  I mean I could understand if the skin there was particularly dry for example, that a small amount of serum might be beneficial in hydrating it, but would a cream be capable of the same task, or would it weight the tissue down?

I've searched for the answer and haven't been able to determine whats your thoughts on this so figured I'd ask.

Thank you.


hannah

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Reply with quote  #2 
I think I discussed that some other time. No, I don't think a special cream is necessary, unless you have special needs.

I think that surgeon was talking nonsense.

taylormarie

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #3 
This is interesting. The woman who gives me facials informed me that fluid build up is what causes bags under my eyes, and my eye doctor said that they were a result of allergies. It wasn't until I found out I have a deviated septum that prevents my sinuses from draining that I put two and two together. When we lay down at night fluids can pool under our eyes and some people have a hard time getting those fluids to drain. 
I read that increasing your circulation greatly improves puffiness and swelling, and since my sinuses have trouble draining I have sought methods to assist the process. I purchased a handheld ultrasound facial machine which helps increase circulation and it greatly reduces my eye puffiness in the morning. I am more than happy with it. This might be TMI, but I can really feel the fluid draining, and it has cured my sinus migraines! I'd recommend it if you wake up with puffy eyes. 
It also helps me worry less about waking up at 5am for acting/modeling jobs and looking 100 years old and exhausted. 
hannah

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Reply with quote  #4 
I wish it were that easy!

On the other hand, I am all for the placebos and anything that helps people feel better.

My daughter had surgery to improve sinus drainage, and the surgery was somewhat successful. She does not have a cat anymore (sad but helpful for her numerous allergies and my grandson asthma) and this helps too.

For "puffy" eyes, try cool compresses with strong, decaffeinated tea.

Please don't recommend home "anything" machines in our forum, especially for medical conditions.



Carmen

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #5 
Hanna,

It looks like my eyes need hydration.  They are looking dry under my eyes but I also noticed an increase of thin lines (wrinkles), especially on outer part of the eyes.  When I look at my eyes with a magnifying mirror, the skin has cris cross small thin lines. 

What would you recommend to increase collagen, tightness, hydrate for under my eyes?

I am about to post another post regarding all the actives that I am about to purchase but wondering if it is going to be too much to mix with a moisturizer.  I am wondering I can just use that for under the eyes.

Thanks,
C

hannah

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Reply with quote  #6 
Sorry to be blunt, but why on earth would you look at your face with a magnifying mirror? The only reason to use a magnifier when looking at skin is if you are a dermatologist and are trying to identify malignant moles.



Carmen

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #7 
Because, when I don't have my contacts on, it is difficult to see if makeup is well distributed, or put my mascara on correctly, or when I am cleansing my face or making sure the liquid eyeliner is put on correctly, etc., I use this other mirror which is much more magnified.  I did say a magnified mirror correct?  A dermatologist uses a "magnifier" glass not mirror.  The mirror I am speaking about is sold at various places, ex: Ulta, CVS, etc. and sometimes even hotels have them in the bathrooms.  Hope that clarifies what I meant?

Anyway, I guess I was looking for some advice on my question.

Thank you,
carmen

hannah

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Reply with quote  #8 
I know what you mean, but both mirror and glass do the same: magnify. Nobody needs to see the skin in that kind of detail.

Try ELS serum for "dryness". Petrolatum and lanolin and more effective at keeping water in but they are too heavy for normal situations (they help with burns).

Carmen

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks Hannah!  I appreciate it.  You are right, I should not use the magnified mirror because it does drive me crazy seeing the facial details.  I originally got it so I can see the any facial hair growing under my chin or my eyebrows so I can pluck them. 
hannah

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Reply with quote  #10 
Try to apply "selective view". Ignore anything to do with skin in general besides whatever you NEED to see.  I think the idea of a mirror is to see ourselves the way others see us, so that we can improve the way we look. But unless we date a detective that looks at the world through a magnifying glass, I don't think we need anything more detailed!
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