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angelout

peggissue
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Hello all, I am new here although I have ordered before just never posted. I was wondering what the real deal was or IS with all the hand held light devices that claim to stimulate collagen production. I have also been using this on my face and like the warmth and because I have had much dental work done, well I am thinking will this also stimulate healing.  I have two device and they use different technology or light, the Lightstim and the other is Silk? something, that is like fractional light.
hannah

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In my opinion, these types of devices only heat up your skin. If you like it, that's nice, but don't expect any benefit from them. In fact, too much heat and they may lead to inflammation.

I doubt that there is any real difference between these two devices. Color and intensity, and that's that. Advertisement often use scientific sounding names to advertise their very low tech devices but that is just advertising. High energy is dangerous so it is limited to medical settings (like laser).

I will look them up, anyway.

hannah

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Apparently, the differences have to do with the temperature that the skin reaches.  In any case, high temperature is bad for proteins (boil an egg and you will find out).

Our collagen serum has everything you need to promote collagen synthesis and to PREVENT CHANGES IN STRUCTURE. Proteins must keep their structure intact to do their job.

Incredibly, these light devices are supposed to denature proteins. The equivalent of boiling an egg.

What does this mean? That LEDs (light emitting diodes) are cheap so people without scruples get women to spend good money on them to ruin their skin.

I use LED to decorate my garden with color lights that switch on at night. Pretty and safe.
hannah

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I found out that in some circumstances they also produce ROS* (reactive oxygen species) so they will also damage the skin in this way. Apparently, they can also inhibit collagen synthesis!


Also, apparently LEDs can be used for jaw disorders, to alleviate pain. But be careful with your skin!

Comparative clinical study of light analgesic effect on temporomandibular disorder (TMD) using red and infrared led therapy

By:Panhoca, Vitor Hugo, Zanirato Lizarelli, Rosane de Fatima, Nunez, Silvia Cristina, de Andrade Pizzo, Renata Campi  Grecco, Clovis);Paolillo, Fernanda Rossi Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador. LASERS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE (2015)30: 815-822


Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been widely applied in pain relief in several clinical situations, including temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, the effects of LED therapy on TMD has not been investigated. This study aims to evaluate the effects of red and infrared LEDs on: (1) tissue temperature in ex vivo and (2) pain relief and mandibular range of motion in patients with TMD. Thirty patients between 18 and 40 years old were included and randomly assigned to three groups. The two experimental groups were: the red LED (630 +/- 10 nm) group and the infrared LED (850 +/- 10 nm) group. The irradiation parameters were 150 mW, 300 mW/cm(2), 18 J/cm(2), and 9 J/point. The positive control group received an infrared laser (780 nm) with 70 mW, 1.7 W/cm(2), 105 J/cm(2), and 4.2 J/point. LED and laser therapies were applied bilaterally to the face for 60 s/point. Five points were irradiated: three points around the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), one point for the temporalis, and one near the masseter. Eight sessions of phototherapy were performed, twice a week for 4 weeks. Pain induced by palpating the masseter muscle and mandibular range of motion (maximum oral aperture) were measured at baseline, immediately after treatment, 7 days after treatment, and 30 days after treatment. There was an increase in tissue temperature during both the red and the infrared LED irradiation in ex vivo. There was a significant reduction of pain and increase of the maximum oral aperture for all groups (p a parts per thousand yenaEuro parts per thousand 0.05). There was no significant difference in pain scores and maximum oral aperture between groups at baseline or any periods after treatment (p a parts per thousand yenaEuro parts per thousand 0.05). The current study showed that red and infrared LED therapy can be useful in improving outcomes related to pain relief and orofacial function for TMD patients. We conclude that LED devices constitute an attractive alternative for LLLT.

angelout

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #5 
Thank you Hannah for your input. I guess I am disgusted that they keep trying to pawn these devices off under false pretenses. They should not be getting FDA approval as a anti aging device.

hannah

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They don't get approval from the FDA as "antiaging" devices. The FDA approval does not mean a certification of effectiveness. That is a misrepresentation.

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/cdrh_docs/pdf15/k153399.pdf
angelout

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks Hannah, this is what we call BS. It is disgusting how they misrepresent these items. I have often wondered WHY, if the light worked independently then why is always sold with a product like serum as an adjunct. 
hannah

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Well, they could do better by selling SAS collagen serum by itself. But that would not make them much money.
angelout

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Quote:
Originally Posted by angelout
Thank you Hannah for your input. I guess I am disgusted that they keep trying to pawn these devices off under false pretenses. They should not be getting FDA approval as a anti aging device.

I must admit I find this to be very contrary to what they say on QVC. They specifically say these devices are approved by the FDA to treat LINES AND WRINKLES and that they will over time PROMOTE collagen growth. 
hannah

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The FDA does not do that kind of pronouncements. This is a misinterpretation of the process of FDA approval for these devices. I will try to get for information on the process, which is not very clear. There is a letter by a lawyer of the company to the FDA asking for permission to sell X because it is similar enough to Y already approved by the FDA.
The FDA does not actually test the device. Sorry if I am not clear but the process is not what it seems.
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