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hannah

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Reply with quote  #11 
Thanks for thee good news!
mathewjames

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Reply with quote  #12 
Hey Guys!

So i just purchased the Quartet Serums from SAS and i have started using The Antioxidant Serum and The Collagen Serum, only i think they are causing my Perioral Dermatitis to flare up! [frown] The skin around my nose has become slightly red and itchy and i'm truly devastated because i had high hopes for a gentle product that doesn't cause irritation and is rich in antioxidants and has wonderful anti ageing properties.

Any other Perioral Dermatitis sufferers experienced this from these products? Any idea what the trigger 'active' ingredient might be?

More so, can anyone suggest SAS products that i SHOULD be using instead? Ready to Use is preferable but i'd be willing to make my own too. I really want to stick with SAS because i want anti ageing and antioxidants. Just needs to be able to keep the Perioral Dermatitis at bay. I haven't change anything else in my diet or regime. I currently use SK-II Facial Treatment Essence with no issues.

Really hope to hear from you guys! Love the forum and love the products! 




hannah

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Reply with quote  #13 
Maybe you could start by doing what I tell everybody: change your toothpaste. If your skin is in bad shape, almost anything could cause a flare up. So look at the everyday products you have been using for years and change one at a time.

Try our ultramarine serum, it is soothing and anti-inflammatory.
mathewjames

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Reply with quote  #14 
thank you! [smile]
HottieMcNaughty

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Reply with quote  #15 
I think changing your toothpaste is a great idea.   Also if you hold your phone to your mouth and ear sometimes that can be an issue.  I'd also suggest a dr visit (although it sounds like you don't have insurance) to see if you've got an underlying allergy to something.
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aswander

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Reply with quote  #16 
This all happened before I found SkinActives at 40.  I went through a bout with perioral dermatitis from 35-38. The first year I attempted self-treatment, all the natural approaches and it continued getting worse. At 37, I went to a dermatologist who diagnosed me and put me on branded form of doxycycline called "Oracea" and it cleared it right up which took about 2 months to fully go away. I remained on Oracea for about 1 year.  Then I stopped it and the perioral dermatiis hasn't come back. I do get breakouts and have a sustained low level of inflammatory acne, when I'm using SkinActives products regularly the problem is kept in check. When I get lazy and stop using them, the inflammatory acne comes back.  
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aswander

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Reply with quote  #17 
I also changed to a non-SLS non-Flouride toothpaste at 37 along with taking the Oracea.


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hannah

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Reply with quote  #18 
It is interesting to see why Oracea, doxycycline at a dosis with no antibiotic activity, helps with rosacea. Here is the answer. We discussed this a while ago in a newsletter.
"Patients with rosacea have increased amounts of cathelicidin and protease activity. Patients with papulo-pustular rosacea treated for 12 weeks with doxycycline, and cathelicidin and protease activity was measured in stratum corneum samples. Treatment with doxycycline significantly reduced inflammatory lesions and improved IGA scores compared to placebo, including subpopulations with mild and recently diagnosed rosacea. Cathelicidin expression and protein levels decreased over the course of 12 weeks in subjects treated with doxycycline. Low levels of protease activity and cathelicidin expression at 12 weeks correlated with treatment success. These results support the etiological role of the cathelicidin activation pathway in rosacea and the mechanism of doxycycline in its treatment."
hannah

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Reply with quote  #19 
By Artist (aaclouti) on Rosacea
Heloooo ladies! Any exciting new mixes? I've been busy, too, but curious about any new news. I've been trying to simplify my routine, but am considering trying topical saw palmetto. Yes, I am fickle and proud of it    Anyone tried Saw Palmetto yet?

Here is an excerpt from the SAS newsletter on the science of why I would try it:
"In rosacea, cathelicidin and SCTE are much more abundant. The consequence is a massive increase in antimicrobial peptides that can be different in structure from those found in normal skin. The abnormal peptides are capable of producing rosacea-like symptoms: redness, an increase in visible blood vessels, bumps or pimples.  Knowing that these peptides may be at the root of rosacea, it may seem easy to find a remedy and suppress the "celtic curse": decrease the formation of the peptides. Unfortunately, the two processes involved, incrased expression of cathelicidin and increased expression of the SCTEs, cannot be easily modified.
What NOT to do if you have rosacea: vitamin D and retinoic acid seem to promote expression of cathelicidin, so people with rosacea should avoid these actives. Also, two growth factors are known to increase cathelicidin expression: insulin-like growth factor I and TGF-alpha, so run away if you see a skin care product (NOT made by SAS, obviously) that includes either factor in its ingredient list.
What else can you do? It may be possible to decrease the activity of the protease involved in the process, which belongs to a class known as serine protease because the amino acid serine is involved in the mechanism of action. Several actives inhibit serine proteases, including lupeol (present in saw palmetto), pumpkin fruit trypsin inhibitors, quercetin, and (maybe) betulinic acid. Also, protect your skin from infection and weakening of the skin barrier, to prevent further increase in the expression of cathelicidin............"
Hmmm. Perhaps I should try quercetin, too..
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