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fut

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #1 
All Rosacea sufferers know (I hope!) that chemical sun blocks are irritating and a no no for Rosacea skin.  I am interested to know which sun blocks you guys are using and any recommendations of good actives to add to these sun blocks.

Perhaps in the future SA will add actives like Zinc Oxide, Titanium Dioxide, Dimethicone, etc so we can create the perfect, non irritating sun block!

Susie89

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #2 

Hi fut,

 

The very final layer of cream that I apply to my rosacea prone skin is CALMIN Environmental Protection Cream (EPC) SPF 15.  It has transparent zinc oxide and is not in the least bit heavy.  I know SPF15 may be a bit low for some, but I live in the UK and avoid the sun anyway.  Despite the parabens which normally irritate my skin, this doesn't for some reason.  May be down to the oils and other goodies in the ingredients list:-

 

Aqua (Water)
Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice
Zinc Oxide
Cyclomethicone
Ethyl Hexyl Methoxycinnamate
Ethylhexyl Ethylhexanoate
Glycerin
Myristyl Myristate
Cetyl Alcohol
Borago Officinalis (Borage) Seed Oil
Ribes Nugrum (Black Currant) Seed Oil
Polysorbate 60
Sorbitan Stearate
Benzyl Alcohol
Phenoxyethanol
Panthenol
Bisabolol
Tocopheryl Acetate
Xanthan Gum
Allantoin
Methylparaben
Dimethicone
Butylparaben
Ethylparaben
Isobutylparaben
Propylparaben

hannah

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Reply with quote  #3 
Interesting! Because this sunblock contains a chemical filter, Ethylhexyl Methoxycinnamate. So how firm and clear is that rule that people will rosacea will be harmed by chemical filters?





sojournman

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #4 

I've been reading up on the topic of UVA/UVB protection recently in prep for the spring/summer and having just been diagnosed with Rosacea, wanted to ensure no (or little) further skin damage or Rosacea flare-ups occured.

 

It would appear that at least some Rosaceans tolerate chemical sunscreens as opposed to those with Zinc Oxide, though most articles seem to point us in the direction of Zinc Oxide.

 

Personally, I'm wondering if this notion isn't simply something that has snowballed from the inertia of some original articles. Certainly the logic is there; Rosaceans often have not only sensitive skin but P&P's which would likey be more easily irritated by chemical sun products.

 

Here's a list of CDA-Recognized Sunscreens:

http://www.dermatology.ca/english/sun/products_e.html

 

I know some have had good luck with La Roche-Posay Anthelios and Ombrelle. Mexoryl isn't available in the USA if I recall (not yet approved by the FDA) but products like the Anthelios can be obtained through mail-order/e-bay. I'm thinking of trying some myself as there is an e-bay seller for it within 1/2hr. drive of me. The chairman of dermatology at Columbia University is quoted as saying it (Mexoryl) gives us almost perfect protection from sunshine.

 

I don't think zinc oxide products have a lock on skin care for Rosaceans and some people can't use them. The chemical ones above are non-comedogenic while zinc oxide is occlusive.

 

Apparently just last week, a consumer lawsuit was filed against sunscreen makers accusing them of exposing millions of people to cancer and other dangers. (article wasn't sure if this was lawyer or consumer initiated though)

 

It's important to keep in mind that sunscreen/block needs to cover the entire UVA/UVB spectrum. Some estimate that UVA is responsible for up to 90% of our skin aging. One site has a picture of a monk who had never been out in daylight and one of an American Indian. Both the same age, I believe. The difference is unreal. Baby skin vs. lines that resemble caverns. UVA can penetrate up to 4 ft. of water. Up to 100% can be reflected off water. 25% off concrete.

 

Sunscreen is really only intended as a backup to what should be sun avoidance between 10 and 2. A cotton t-shirt will give you an spf of about 5. UVA comes through your windows. (except the front windshield of automobiles due to the laminate/crash protection features)

 

Sun avoidance should be one's primary consideration. Check your local forcast for the UV index. Consider sunscreen rated clothing.

 

Some actives are thought to increase the SPF rating of sunscreens, however without the concoction being submitted for testing, you are really rolling the dice. Better to use the actives prior to putting on the sunscreen, allowing to be absorbed fully. This might mean you can't go out for an HOUR prior to putting on the actives, if you want the sunscreen to be fully effective.

 

Studies have shown that many people apply sunscreen improperly, rendering it 50-75% less effective than its SPF rating. If you've ever had a blotchy sunburn, this could be why.

 

Lips are often neglected in one's suncare regime. Don't leave them out. Lighter shades of lipstick are virtually ineffective and besides, lipstick typically wears off during the day. This is where zinc oxide, esp. in newer (nano sized) forms might be the better choice.

 

Lastly, many Rosaceans are on oral antibiotics which can increase photosensitivity.

 

With Rosacea, it's important to try things (in moderation) and get to know what works (or not) for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Susie89

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #5 

sojournman,

 

Thanks for such a well informed post.  Lots of food for thought there. 

 

Hannah, I have no idea why my rosacea skin is accepting of this particular formulation (depsite the inclusion of chemical screens and parabens -- usually a big no no) and not others. Counteracted by other active ingredients?  Who knows.  I think it may serve to illustrate that rosacea is an extremely complex condition, maybe even a syndrome, with huge variables person to person.  


Sus  

Haley

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #6 

Quote:
(Mexoryl) gives us almost perfect protection from sunshine.

This Mexoryl is it chemical sunscreen then? Is that why isn't not approved in the US? TIA

 


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sojournman

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peggissue
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Reply with quote  #7 

Chemical, yes. FDA considers it a drug. Here's a link to some background on it as relates to use in the USA by ABC News:

http://abcnews.go.com/2020/Health/story?id=858453&page=1

 

Europeans and other countries even have a rating system for UVA just as we do for UVB (ie SPF) but it's not foolproof so perhaps the USA is hoping to come up with a better system before they allow any more regulated product for UVA in the marketplace. Just a guess...

 

Personally, I'd want to be using something with either Mexoryl or Zinc Oxide in it. I have an old bottle of Ombrelle that has Mexoryl listed as an ingredient. It was one of my favorite brands without knowing at the time it protects so well. It's probably one of the best bangs for the buck. La Roche-Posay Anthelios is a fair bit more expensive though very well liked by those that use it.

hannah

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Reply with quote  #8 
Most sunscreens contain chemical filters, and all of the sunscreens with high SPF contain them. Mexoryl is a new arrival and has to go through testings to be approved by the FDA.

The reason why Mexoryl is considered to be so special is because it works in the UVA wavelength  range and it is more stable than other available filters that wok in this region.





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Reply with quote  #9 

I have rosacea and do very well with La Roche Posay Anthelios SPF 60.

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