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Susan121414

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #1 
I was born with bright red hair which turned light red as I got older, and when I was fourteen the blond in it started to darken. Now it grows in dark blond/light brown with a coppery tone, but it certainly isn't like the fiery red I used to have.

I know ASIP signalling protein binds to the MC1R gene to make it produce pheomelanin (which causes red hair) instead of eumelanin (which causes other hair colors). The hair serum sold on this site affects expression of tyrosinase, which plays a part in all this and in preventing the hair from graying, but I'm not a scientist and am having trouble understanding how it would work on me. I wonder if the serum would make my hair even darker blond/brown than it is, instead of activating the lighter red/blond in my hair.

Since I have the genes for red/light blond hair and was born with that hair color, I think there must be a way, through nutrition and topical application of actives, to encourage my follicles to produce that color again. Maybe it can't ever be as bright as it was, but I'm only 33, and have no gray hairs yet, so I want to try this experiment and see what happens.

If anyone has insight into how actives (and specifically the KGF hair serum sold on this site) might affect my hair color, I'd love to hear your info! Thank you.

Also, I've heard from hundreds of other "used-to-be-redheads" on the web and we're all crying about the loss of our red hair. Red hair fades faster than other hair colors--not that it necessarily grays fastest, though I've heard that too--but the brightness in it tends to fade and darken. Most of the redheads you see on the street are used-to-be redheads like me who dye their hair now to try to match their old color.

If anyone could produce a serum that would encourage pheomelanin production so used-to-be-redheads like me could get back at least some of our lost coppery locks, that person would have A GOLDMINE. It might work to turn darkened blond lighter too, and my guess is whoever could do that would end up a billionaire. So many blonds cry about how their hair used to be light and golden when they were younger and now it has darkened and is closer to light brown. There is huge demand for this.

I don't understand the science explained on this page, but it describes how scientists turned the hair of brown mice golden/red...I think by injecting them with something or changing their diet, in order to suppress the genes that express eumelanin (brown/black hair) so all it could produce was pheomelanin (red/blond). Does anyone understand this study better than I can? Science wasn't my best subject in school.

http://www.wikigenes.org/e/gene/e/114618.html


Susan121414

peggissue
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Reply with quote  #2 
Glutathione seems to play a major role. I found this from a Yahoo discussion (not the most reliable source, but it is intriguing):


Edited for content by Hannah.
hannah

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Reply with quote  #3 
We can hardly slow down graying (with our gray hair serum).  We tamper with the expression of our genes all the time, by exercising, eating too much fat, everything we do. From there to affecting specific gene expression in a particular way there is a science fiction leap.   Scientists are trying very hard, especially with people who are born with mutated genes that will result in cancer that can appear as early as before 1 year of age.

I will read the article but not right now. I know that it is Holiday time and I should be shopping for presents. Instead, I am in formulating new products. So please be patient and remind me next week if I still did not answer your question. This week is going to be very busy but also, I hope, very productive.

hannah

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Reply with quote  #4 
I'd rather you don't post that kind of 'information" from assorted websites. It is usually rubbish and distracting and misleading (yes, all of it).

Links to scientific publications and University websites are welcome.

Questions about anything are welcome too, just don't include links to assorted websites. The last thing we want is our forum to disseminate misinformation.
hannah

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Reply with quote  #5 
I started reading and, as you knew, it is complicated. I will write more about the subject but, in the meantime, I am giving you this bit so that you start feeling lucky about the color change:

"Eumelanin is photoprotective while pheomelanin is phototoxic to pigmented tissues. "

http://www.nature.com/news/redhead-pigment-boosts-skin-cancer-risk-1.11711
webellion

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Reply with quote  #6 
I used to be a strawberry blonde when I was younger too. Now just dishwatery blonde. le sigh and hello salon
hannah

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Reply with quote  #7 
I did not have time to read much more but so far my strong impression is that red hair is a disadvantageous mutation that happens to be very attractive. I would assume that if pheomelanin reacts with UV to form free radicals, the only way to keep the color a bit longer is to use a lot of sunscreen, including hair sunscreen, which I am sure is sold somewhere.
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